Japanese Garden, Zen Garden: our practical tips to create the

Here are 7 tips to create a Japanese garden, a Zen garden and bring peace and serenity to your outdoor space.

Olivier Geslin

Designed as tables, Japanese gardens invite to quietude and serenity. Lanterns, ferns, water, stones, characterize this Zen garden full of spirituality. How to develop it? What plants to favor? What furniture can I install it? The Japanese garden, landscape designer Olivier Geslin book his advice to create a true Japanese garden, true to Japanese art.

In one Japanese garden, the with nature is paramount and the arts are limited. Fairly strict rules, fit for Japanese art are to be observed to make a true Zen garden with happy marriage of the mineral and vegetable. Eager to learn more, Town House went to meet the Japanese garden-landscape designer Olivier Geslin to design a Zen garden in the rules of Japanese art, where there is a feeling of peace, healing and sobriety. 

>> Read also >> 10 plants for a Japanese garden 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

Trees, rocks and fences structure the Japanese garden, it is the most important. Then, you must: 

1. Avoid straight lines and emphasize the asymmetry in a Zen garden

Unlike the traditional French garden, the Japanese garden like asymmetry because in Japan "harmony arises from imbalances", Noted landscape architect Olivier Geslin. The different parts of the Japanese garden composed essentially of trees and rocks, so will form a beautiful asymmetry to ensure balance and serenity in the garden. There will be no marked paths including borders but formant rocks asymmetrical triangle. 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

2. Organize the Japanese garden on an odd rhythm

In Japanese art, odd numbers are considered auspicious, bringing positive. This rule is expressed as follows in the Zen garden: no plants planted by two or four, but only odd number; figures 3, 5 and 7 are particularly preferred. The same goes for the rocks: their number must be odd. 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

3. Choose plants adapted to the Zen garden

All plants do not fit into the composition of a Japanese garden. Those preferred are: Persistent plants such as oak, fruit trees, pines or Japanese maple for decoration background. Next, install ericaceous plants, bamboo or shrubs to slow growth. Finally, there are ground cover plants. 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

4. Focus on simplicity in the Japanese garden

The Japanese love sobriety and simplicity. These two values ​​are reflected in the composition of Zen gardens. For example, do not multiply the artifices like lanterns, bridges, waterfalls: not too much need. But favoring one decorative element. If you opt for a lantern or bridge, avoid tinsel model or varnish: Use only a dull or plain decorative accessory. Finally, maintain a certain elegance in the shapes of your plants, rocks and decorative elements to create a harmonious Japanese garden.  

>> Read also >> Top Side of landscape House Projects 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

5. Respect the spaces between the elements to highlight in a Zen garden

In continuation of the previous council, the Japanese like to highlight simple elements. Thus, avoid accumulating too many plants and give the impression of clutter. But rather think isolate for their potential to be revealed or to space to put simply value. 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

6. Prioritize decorations or furniture made from natural materials

The Japanese live in harmony with nature, so avoid installing too many garden furniture, much less those of plastic. The same for the rocks resin: they are banned. Prefer natural materials, even if they may not be sustainable: all creation is doomed to disappear in Japan. 

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

7. Adopt a decorative style by avoiding clichés

It should have a focal point with an element to highlight: the rock, the water, the Buddhist symbol ... Do not you scatter multiplying decorative styles.  

7 tips to create a Japanese garden

Olivier Geslin

Olivier Geslin, landscape designer of Japanese garden, niwashi.fr 

This entry was posted in Garden, Terrace. Bookmark the permalink.